‘I have questions I’ve never asked. Worries I’ve never shared. Thoughts that circle and collide and die screaming because they never make it outside my head. Stuff like that, if you let it go—it’s a survival risk.’

Sixteen-year-old Nate McKee is doing his best to be invisible. He’s worried about a lot of things—how his dad treats Nance and his twin half-brothers; the hydro crop in his bedroom; his reckless friend, Merrick.

Nate hangs out at the local youth centre and fills his notebooks with things he can’t say. But when some of his pages are stolen, and his words are graffitied at the centre, Nate realises he has allies. He might be able to make a difference, change his life, and claim his future. Or can he?

This Is How We Change the Ending is raw and real, funny and heartbreaking—a story about what it takes to fight back when you’re not a hero.

Vikki Wakefield @VikkiWakefield
@Postteen @ZanaFraillon Kayaking sounds lovely but I reckon I’d be thinking about not tipping over instead of plotting.
Vikki Wakefield @VikkiWakefield
@MegMcKinlay Oh I didn’t mean at the same time. Well not...often.
Vikki Wakefield @VikkiWakefield
@DarkMatterzine @ZanaFraillon Cats! No respect for office hours. Or anything else for that matter...
Vikki Wakefield @VikkiWakefield
@ZanaFraillon I need a new a magical place stat.
Vikki Wakefield @VikkiWakefield
@tanner_lian That would certainly stop people who pee in the shower. 😬
Vikki Wakefield @VikkiWakefield
@libbyturns We’re discussing this and the consensus is yes. 😊
Vikki Wakefield @VikkiWakefield
@MegMcKinlay Does it work the same? (Because drinking wine and showering a lot isn’t cost effective.)
Vikki Wakefield @VikkiWakefield
@michaeljpryor As well as public baths there should be writers’ waterfalls.

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